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Rahul Thadani

Latest security news from the last week

August 10, 2012
1 Comment
Estimated reading time: 2 minutes

Tech journalist blames Amazon and Apple for hack
Mat Honan, formerly of Gizmodo, saw all his accounts hacked and devices wiped clean this week thanks to some elementary flaws in Amazon’s and Apple’s support systems. Anyone interested in security should read details about this ‘epic hacking‘. Apparently, all the hacker wanted was Honan’s Twitter handle. This led to his iPhone, iPad and MacBook getting wiped clean; his Twitter and Gmail accounts getting blocked and a serious breach of his data and privacy.

Experts say local security products can counter cyber threats
Security experts claim that India needs to start relying on indigenous anti-malware products that are manufactured locally. More and more nations export low cost products and utilize these to carry out cyberespionage activities. While such hardware and software seems harmless at first, constant updates from the manufacturer regularly causes products to turn rogue.

Deleted content remains on Facebook servers for months
What do you think happens when you delete pictures or videos from Facebook? According to sources, such content stays on Facebook’s servers for months even after they have been deleted. This interesting news update highlights this security flaw and we feel this is something that deserves more attention. It is rather alarming to learn that such information is not completely removed when we wish to do so.

Google tweaks rules for Android Market app developers
In order to combat the growing numbers of Android malware, Google has revamped certain rules and guidelines for app developers. Rules regarding application names, disclosure of personal information and payment policies have been tweaked. It is hoped that these changes would help reduce the number of malicious apps seen in Google Play (Android Market).

Facebook provides email address to report phishing scams
Rampant phishing scams on Facebook can now be flagged by sending an email to “phish@fb.com”. The social network aims to reduce phishing attacks by creating a new channel that works in partnership with their internal detection team.

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Rahul Thadani
About Rahul Thadani
Rahul is a web enthusiast and blogger, and has been writing about the computer security industry for the last three years. Following the latest technology trends,...
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  1. Thanks for update.

    Reply