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Prashant Waman

IPv6 – the Future of Internet

September 5, 2013
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Estimated reading time: 4 minutes

If there is anything that can be placed after food, air, and water, it is Internet. The number of computers connected to the internet has become directly proportional to the services that are deployed over networks. This post talks about IPv6, which is the next generation Internet Protocol.

IPv6 - the Future of Internet

What is IP Address?
Like every element in this universe, every computer has a unique identity. And the identity of every computer is determined by a unique Internet Protocol (IP) address assigned to it. The version of IP that was widely deployed was IPv4; the 4th version in the development of IP. It is usually referred to as the backbone of modern Internet.

IPv4 has exhausted!
The use of Internet for computers, sensors, telephones, kitchen appliances, remote medical assistance, education, transportation, etc., has been growing exponentially. And this very factor has marked the exhaustion of the IPv4 IPs.

An announcement by the Number Resource Organization (NRO), on 3rd February 2011, clarified that the free pool of available IPv4 addresses has fully depleted. The Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) allocated the remaining IANA pool equally between the five RIRs (Regional Internet Registries). This means that there are no longer any IPv4 addresses available for allocation from the IANA to the five RIRs. Although the complete extinction of IPv4 has not yet occurred, adaptation of IPv6 is vital for all Internet stakeholders.

What is IPv6?
IPv6 is the latest version of the Internet Protocol that has been designed as a replacement for IPv4. IPv6 is usually known as the Internet’s next-generation protocol.

How is IPv6 Better than IPv4?
IPv6 betters IPv4 in the following respects:

Large Address Space
With the growing number of mobile phones, PDAs, laptops, handheld devices, etc., additional blocks of IP addresses need to be created. And IPv4 cannot carry out this job. This is where IPv6 comes as a relief.

IPv6 increases the IP address size from 32 bits to 128 bits, thereby increasing the number of globally routable IP addresses, from approximately 4.29×109 = 4.2 billion to 3.4×1038 = 340 trillion trillion trillion addresses. Theoretically, IPv6 can provide 3.4×1038 / 7×109 (i.e. population on earth) = 4.86×1028 IP addresses per person on earth.

Security
Unlike devices with IPv4, those with IPv6 can establish a secure pipeline between them without user intervention. This is possible because IPv6 has a built in IPSec support which can negotiate security parameters dynamically.

Mobility
The Mobile IPv6 (MIPv6) offers roaming capabilities for mobile nodes in IPv6 network. This allows mobile devices, such as PDAs and smart phones, to change the wireless networks without breaking their connections.

The MIPv6 allows devices to move geographically without changing the IPv6 address assigned to it.

Simplified network configuration (Auto-configuration)
Similar to IPv4, IPv6 supports stateful auto-configuration to assign IP address to a computer using Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol for IPv6 (DHCPv6).

To make the network configuration more simplified, IPv6 supports stateless auto-configuration. In this, no server is required to obtain configuration information, and router advertisements are used to create addresses. This creates a “plug-and-play” environment thus, simplifying management and administration.

IPv6 also allows automatic address configuration and reconfiguration, and administrators do not require access to the clients to renumber network addresses.

QoS (Quality of Service)
IPv6 ensures improved quality of service because it helps in identifying traffic and defines how it should be handled. This is ensured by the Flow Label field in the IPv6 header. Packets that belong to this flow are easily identified by routers and are specially handled.

Extensibility
IPv6 is designed to have an optional header separate from the main IPv6 header. This allows the protocol to be extensible in the future which offers optimized support for new features without redesigning the IPv6 protocol.

More Efficient Routing
IPv6 is better than its predecessor IPv4 in that it makes routing more efficient and hierarchical. This is done by shrinking the size of routing tables. Internet Service Providers assign prefixes to their customers’ network. With the help of IPv6, they can aggregate all such prefixes into a single prefix, and announce the same to the Internet Protocol.

More efficient Packet Processing
IPv4 uses IP-level checksum to protect IPv4 packets against data corruption. There is no IP-level checksum in IPv6. So, at every router hop (a hop occurs every time a packet is forwarded to the next router), the need of recalculating the checksum is eliminated. This makes packet processing more efficient.

End-to-end transparency
NAT, short for network address translation is used in IPv4 for mapping an entire network to a single IP address. It hides multiple hosts behind one gateway device, and represents all these hosts by a single IP address. IPv6 does not require NAT. Thanks to the vast address space, a computer with IPv6 can stay in peer-to-peer connection with another computer. This very feature helps enabling new and valuable services. Services like VoIP and QoS will become more robust, as they are easier to create and maintain.

The only question that remains is – When and how to manage the migration from IPv4 to IPv6 without affecting existing services?

The transition from IPv4 to IPv6 is currently happening but with a gradual pace. There is also a degree of uncertainty over the adoption of IPv6 standards and implementation. Although the transition will not be effortless, formulating plans by Internet stakeholders, engineers, and government bodies will boost the migration.

Have something to add to this story? Share it in the comments.

60 Comments

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  1. Hrushi SonarSeptember 6, 2013 at 9:48 AM

    Wow really gr8 and valuable info regarding the IPv6, Rally thank you so much Rajib sir for this info.

    Regards,
    Hrushi Sonar

    Reply
  2. ZeroMile Software ServicesSeptember 6, 2013 at 12:20 PM

    Nice info content. Google, Microsoft and other big players of the industry already started IPv6.

    Reply
  3. Sk Maharaj AliSeptember 6, 2013 at 12:33 PM

    This is great. The IPv6 Procedure is great.
    I am watting for this new generation IP module.
    Thanx to QUICK HEAL to give us such valuable Information.
    Thank You Quick Heal.

    Reply
  4. I want required

    Reply
  5. Pushpendra SinghSeptember 6, 2013 at 1:10 PM

    How can get registered in IPv6?

    Reply
  6. K v kumpavatSeptember 6, 2013 at 2:15 PM

    Good….Best….I Like This Information.

    Reply
  7. The IPv6 Procedure really gr8 .
    I am watting for this new generation IP module.
    Thanx to QUICK HEAL to give us such valuable Information.
    Thank You Quick Heal

    Reply
  8. K.C.MAHESWARENSeptember 6, 2013 at 4:04 PM

    sir really superb!

    we need more knowledge about you
    many thanks

    Reply
  9. K.C.MAHESWARENSeptember 6, 2013 at 4:05 PM

    really superb sir

    Reply
  10. Really its superb according to next generation.

    Reply
  11. thanks very much for next generation mostly thankful to Quickheal providing information

    Reply
  12. ca saurabh singhSeptember 6, 2013 at 7:05 PM

    Nice really great info…

    Reply
  13. Thanks a lot for this information to QH and Rajib. As I have/had no idea about the version of IP(s), one question is coming in my mind, after IPv4 why not IPv5?

    Reply
    • Hello Mr/Ms Mukherjee,

      After the release of IPv4 in 1981, work started on an experimental protocol ST2 (Internet Stream Protocol 2) which was considered as IPv5. However, it was never widely deployed due to some limitations.

      Regards,

      Reply
  14. prakash.n.gohilSeptember 6, 2013 at 8:55 PM

    supar dupar sir

    Reply
  15. sumit kumar das dawnSeptember 6, 2013 at 9:19 PM

    Really superb sir

    Reply
  16. chinmay ratnaparkhiSeptember 6, 2013 at 10:29 PM

    GOOD……….

    Reply
  17. it is amazing sir………..

    Reply
  18. superb sir

    Reply
  19. Really nice article !!!

    Reply
  20. dharmeshghodasaraSeptember 7, 2013 at 1:21 AM

    He…
    Good mobile & outher usare security.
    Thanks quick heal total security.

    Reply
  21. WOW…it’s really an awesome technique for future.

    Reply
  22. Thanks for information. But my question to you is is quick heal antivirus softwares ready to face to fututre? I mean, with arrival of IPV6, new undefined virus, trojans etc. will also come. Quick heal subsdribers will be happy if you through light on measures taken by your company to be ready with IPV6.

    Reply
    • Hello Hemant,

      Quick Heal Terminator is now IPv6 ready. With IPv6, it is now possible to create new communication protocols which can be exploited by malware authors. With Quick Heal’s IDS, Web Security and other security features, the attacks through IPv6 can be controlled.

      Regards,

      Reply
  23. Remarkable information. Sir, is there any positive information increase in speed of internet in India.

    Reply
  24. Ravindra ChaudhariSeptember 7, 2013 at 11:39 AM

    Nice Information
    Thank You to update our Knowledge Regarding IP Version 6

    Reply
  25. Dr. Shiv Rai puriSeptember 7, 2013 at 1:11 PM

    Great information in the field of information technology.
    Please do continue to write such valuable and informative
    material of common interest in future also.
    Regards
    Shiv Rai Puri

    Reply
  26. jigar thakorSeptember 7, 2013 at 3:02 PM

    is it true that after coming of ipv6 each & every thing will be given a unique id

    Reply
    • Hello Jigar,

      There are plenty of IPv6 IP’s and practically you can assign a unique IPv6 IP to every device which can be connected to the Internet. For instance, if you are assigning an IPv6 IP to your TV, then your TV can be uniquely identified over the Internet using the IP.

      Regards,

      Reply
  27. Very nice

    Reply
  28. Ramachandra.DSeptember 7, 2013 at 4:15 PM

    Dear Friend
    I purchased Quick Heal Pro 2013.and now after 3 months later it is not working,become struck for 4% scanning….and my pc is in Virus condition..can help me

    Reply
  29. manas kumar samalSeptember 7, 2013 at 5:15 PM

    Great information in the field of information technology.
    Please do continue to write such valuable and informative
    material of common interest in future also. MANAS – 9776604279

    Reply
  30. George DevasiSeptember 7, 2013 at 5:48 PM

    The Static IP and dyanamic ip will remain same in IPV6 ?

    Reply
  31. it’s gr8…!!

    Reply
  32. shakeel ansariSeptember 7, 2013 at 7:22 PM

    Dear sir,, thanks for sharing such a really good and needful posts..

    I have some doubts about IVp6,, like if i brought a new net dongle(like airtel, reliance, vodafone, uninor etc) or D-link multi device support wi-fi device(which support dongle, sim card or LAN cable and make it wi-fi) than does they competible with the new IPv6?
    Or should it all been worthless after IPv6?
    Should this thing effect only websites or ISPs too?

    Reply
    • Hello Shakeel,

      Net dongle can support IPv6 but is dependent on the provider. Kindly check with your service provider.

      D-link devices used for Internet sharing are basically routers with Wi-Fi support. As a router, it should support IPv6 and most latest D-link routers are IPv6 ready. But these devices are just a medium to get the Internet which is provided by an ISP. So if the ISP is providing the IPv6 support, it should work with D-link Wi-Fi routers. For example, get a wired Internet connection from TATA which supports IPv6. Terminate that in D-link Wi-Fi router (Not ADSL router) through LAN and you can share the Internet using IPv6 IP.

      Regards,

      Reply
  33. Jayanti ShahSeptember 7, 2013 at 7:52 PM

    gr8, since I ever see this ipv6 in property of location connection (adaptor settings), A question blinks in my mind why it is for? I very thankful to you, sir, today I got the reply.

    Reply
  34. Thank your for the brilliants explanation concerning IP Adresses

    Reply
  35. Ramesh Chander PuriSeptember 8, 2013 at 3:36 PM

    Really awesome, Brilliant. Go ahead please , do it fast.

    Reply
  36. Satish KumarSeptember 8, 2013 at 3:45 PM

    G8 news, but how can get this

    Reply
  37. really very nice….looking for the launch of IPV6…..shortly…thanx quick heal…

    Reply
  38. Bappadittya MistriSeptember 8, 2013 at 6:58 PM

    Very nice

    Reply
  39. Rajib Sir,
    How can I approach my Internet Service Provider for IPv6 registration?
    Plz tell me the full procedure.

    Reply
  40. Tks for the great info abt ipv6

    Reply
  41. goooooooooood……
    ….

    Reply
  42. Alok vaibhavSeptember 9, 2013 at 7:40 AM

    I am so glad to know this news.
    Thank u very much quick heal.

    Reply
  43. albert dusselSeptember 9, 2013 at 1:03 PM

    glad to hear about this but how can we use this?

    Reply
  44. Sajal PanditSeptember 9, 2013 at 4:11 PM

    awesome

    Reply
  45. I am so glad to know this news.

    Reply
  46. Rajesh Kalamkar (Jain)September 10, 2013 at 1:03 PM

    Very important information. IP6 will static IP to every user or user have to applied for that as in IP4? Please give me information.

    Reply
  47. will the QH work on both ipv4 and ipv6 machines in same network
    windows Server 2008 is having both ips and One connected PC is having ipv4 and other is having both.

    Reply